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The story of the Wampanoag Indians and their dealing with the Indians is told in a manner appropriate for young readers in this charming but tragic book. Massasoit was the Great Sachem of the New England tribe that was most helpful and friendly to the Pilgrims in the early years. Within his lifetime however, the number of white men in the area constantly increased and by the time his son, King Philip, came to rule the tribe, conflict between the settlers and the native Indians was inevitable.

[Book Cover] from Massasoit by Alma H. Burton
Massasoit and Standish
THE FIRST THANKSGIVING.


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Preface

In a History of the United States, the fate of the Indian is only an incident in the settlement of the country.

The theme of the historian is the White Man. And so marvelous is the national drama, so dazzling are the achievements of the Puritan and Cavalier, that the Red Man has little more space in our annals, than the primeval forest which once covered the continent.

The author offers this book as a Supplementary Reader for young students, who would know more about the natives of America than can be found in the school histories.

She has endeavored to treat the subject historically, in the light thrown upon it by the best authorities. A few chapters have been devoted to early Colonial life, because the growth and development of the Puritans measure the decline and the exile of the Algonquins.

The "Story of the Indians of New England" is but a short recital of the tragedies enacted on all the hunting-grounds. A Massasoit gave welcome, a Philip avenged injuries, an Annawon surrendered in despair the birthright of his chief, and a feeble remnant, left behind by its fallen heroes, has ever sought refuge on a distant frontier.

It is well to study the annals of the once proud race, whose broken fragments still linger in the rays of the setting sun; for soon these Children of the Bow and Arrow will be known no more in the land of their heritage.


—The Author
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