Contents 
Front Matter The Wolf and the Kid The Tortoise and the Ducks Young Crab and His Mother The Frogs and the Ox The Dog, Cock, and Fox Belling the Cat The Eagle and the Jackdaw The Boy and the Filberts Hercules and the Wagoner The Kid and the Wolf Town Mouse, Country Mouse The Fox and the Grapes The Bundle of Sticks The Wolf and the Crane The Ass and His Driver The Oxen and the Wheels The Lion and the Mouse Shepherd Boy and the Wolf The Gnat and the Bull The Plane Tree The Farmer and the Stork The Sheep and the Pig The Travelers and the Purse The Lion and the Ass Frogs Who Wished for a King The Owl and the Grasshopper The Wolf and His Shadow The Oak and the Reeds The Rat and the Elephant The Boys and the Frogs The Crow and the Pitcher Ants and the Grasshopper The Ass Carrying the Image A Raven and a Swan The Two Goats The Ass and the Load of Salt The Lion and the Gnat The Leap at Rhodes The Cock and the Jewel The Monkey and the Camel The Wild Boar and the Fox The Ass, Fox, and Lion The Birds, Beasts and Bat The Lion, the Bear and the Fox The Wolf and the Lamb The Wolf and the Sheep The Hares and the Frogs The Fox and the Stork The Travelers and the Sea The Wolf and the Lion The Stag and His Reflection The Peacock The Mice and the Weasels The Wolf and the Lean Dog The Fox and the Lion The Lion and the Ass The Dog and His Master's Dinner The Vain Jackdaw The Monkey and the Dolphin The Wolf and the Ass The Monkey and the Cat The Dogs and the Fox The Dogs and the Hides The Rabbit, Weasel, and Cat The Bear and the Bees The Fox and the Leopard The Heron The Cock and the Fox The Dog in the Manger The Wolf and the Goat The Ass and the Grasshoppers The Mule The Fox and the Goat The Cat, Cock, and Mouse The Wolf and the Shepherd The Peacock and the Crane The Farmer and the Cranes The Farmer and His Sons The Two Pots The Goose and the Golden Egg The Fighting Bulls and Frog The Mouse and the Weasel The Farmer and the Snake The Sick Stag The Goatherd and Wild Goats The Spendthrift and Swallow The Cat and the Birds The Dog and the Oyster The Astrologer Three Bullocks and a Lion Mercury and the Woodman The Frog and the Mouse The Fox and the Crab The Serpent and the Eagle The Wolf in Sheep's Clothing The Bull and the Goat The Eagle and the Beetle The Old Lion and the Fox The Man and the Lion The Ass and the Lap Dog The Milkmaid and Her Pail The Wolf and the Shepherd The Goatherd and the Goat The Miser The Wolf and the House Dog The Fox and the Hedgehog The Bat and the Weasels The Quack Toad The Fox Without a Tail The Mischievous Dog The Rose and the Butterfly The Cat and the Fox The Boy and the Nettle The Old Lion The Fox and the Pheasants Two Travelers and a Bear The Porcupine and the Snakes The Fox and the Monkey The Mother and the Wolf The Flies and the Honey The Eagle and the Kite The Stag, Sheep and Wolf The Animals and the Plague The Shepherd and the Lion The Dog and His Reflection The Hare and the Tortoise The Bees, Wasps, and Hornet The Lark and Her Young Ones The Cat and the Old Rat The Fox and the Crow The Ass and His Shadow The Miller, His Son, and the Ass The Ant and the Dove The Man and the Satyr The Wolf, Kid, and Goat The Swallow and the Crow Jupiter and the Monkey The Lion, Ass, and Fox The Lion's Share The Mole and His Mother The North Wind and the Sun The Hare and His Ears The Wolves and the Sheep The Cock and the Fox The Ass in the Lion's Skin The Fisherman and the Fish The Fighting Cocks and Eagle

Aesop for Children - Milo Winter




The Animals and the Plague

Once upon a time a severe plague raged among the animals. Many died, and those who lived were so ill, that they cared for neither food nor drink, and dragged themselves about listlessly. No longer could a fat young hen tempt Master Fox to dinner, nor a tender lamb rouse greedy Sir Wolf's appetite.

At last the Lion decided to call a council. When all the animals were gathered together he arose and said

"Dear friends, I believe the gods have sent this plague upon us as a punishment for our sins. Therefore, the most guilty one of us must be offered in sacrifice. Perhaps we may thus obtain forgiveness and cure for all.

"I will confess all my sins first. I admit that I have been very greedy and have devoured many sheep. They had done me no harm. I have eaten goats and bulls and stags. To tell the truth, I even ate up a shepherd now and then.

"Now, if I am the most guilty, I am ready to be sacrificed. But I think it best that each one con fess his sins as I have done. Then we can decide in all justice who is the most guilty."

"Your majesty," said the Fox, "you are too good. Can it be a crime to eat sheep, such stupid mutton heads? No, no, your majesty. You have done them great honor by eating them up.

"And so far as shepherds are concerned, we all know they belong to that puny race that pretends to be our masters."

All the animals applauded the Fox loudly. Then, though the Tiger, the Bear, the Wolf, and all the savage beasts recited the most wicked deeds, all were excused and made to appear very saint-like and innocent.

It was now the Ass's turn to confess.

"I remember," he said guiltily, `"that one day as I was passing a field belonging to some priests, I was so tempted by the tender grass and my hunger, that I could not resist. nibbling a bit of it. I had no right to do it, I admit—"

A great uproar among the beasts interrupted him. Here was the culprit who had brought misfortune on all of them! What a horrible crime it was to eat grass that belonged to someone else! It was enough to hang anyone for. much more an Ass.

[Illustration] from Aesop for Children by Milo Winter

Immediately they all fell upon him, the Wolf in the lead, and soon had made an end to him, sacrificing him to the gods then and there, and without the formality of an altar.

The weak are made to suffer for the misdeeds of the powerful.