Henry Clay

1777–1852

Henry Clay
WEBSTER, CLAY, AND JACKSON
Henry Clay, an eminent American statesman and orator, was born in Hanover County, Virginia, April 12, 1777. Having studied at a common school, he read law, was admitted to the bar in 1797, and moved to Lexington, Kentucky, where he commenced practice and where he married in 1799. His active leadership of the "War Hawks," an anti-British organization, contributed greatly to the War of 1812, and his talent for political compromise helped to ease tensions between the North and South, and won him the name of the "Great Pacificator." He was several times Speaker of the House of Representatives, strongly advocated the Missouri Compromise, and was immensely popular throughout the country as both a statesman and orator. He ran for presidency three times, but in spite of his political achievements, was never elected. He died in 1852.

Adapted from The Dictionary of Biography by Charles Morris


Key events during the life of Henry Clay:


Year
Event
1777
Birth of Henry Clay
1797
Became a lawyer.
1799
Married.
1806-11
Served on the U.S. Senate.
  Speaker of the House of Representatives.
1821
Promoted the Missouri Compromise.
1831
Elected to the U.S. Senate.
1852
Death of Henry Clay.

Other Resources


Story Links
Book Links
Henry Clay  in  America First—100 Stories from Our History  by  Lawton B. Evans
Henry Clay  in  Heroes of Progress in America  by  Charles Morris
Henry Clay  in  Builders of Our Country: Book II  by  Gertrude van Duyn Southworth


Image Links


Webster, Clay, and Jackson
 in Heroes of Progress in America

Henry Clay
 in Builders of Our Country: Book II

A Session of the House of Representatives in the days of Webster and Clay
 in Builders of Our Country: Book II


Contemporary
Short Biography